Canids Specialist Group

Follow our Youtube channelFind us on Facebook

The place where wolves could soon return

23rd October 2015
Categories: grey wolf

The place where wolves could soon return

By Adam Weymouth BBC News Magazine

14 October 2015 Magazine

The last wolf in the UK was shot centuries ago, but now a "rewilding" process could see them return to Scotland. Adam Weymouth hiked across the Scottish Highlands in the footsteps of this lost species.

 http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-33017511

DNA Analysis confirms African wolf in Morocco

15th September 2015
Categories:

New article in Canid Biology & Conservation: DNA analysis confirms African wolf in Morocco

Siân Waters, Ahmed El Harrad, Zouhair Amhaouch, Lahcen Taiqui and Helen Senn

Abstract
"We collected hair samples from two road-killed animals known as golden jackals Canis aureus in Bouhachem forest in northern Morocco. Analysis of 353bp of cytochrome B and 296 bp of d-loop of the mitochondrial genome placed these two individuals in the same lineage of African wolf Canis lupus lupaster identified by Gaubert et al. (2012). This is the first DNA evidence for the presence of this taxon in Morocco."


Keywords: African wolf, Bouhachem forest, DNA analysis, mitochondrial genome, Morocco

article link

First European jackal discovered in Denmark

15th September 2015
Categories:

Photo: Colourbox

First European Jackal found in Denmark - The Local (Photo: Colourbox)

The wolves who have recently reestablished themselves in Denmark after a nearly 200-year absence may have some competition on the food chain.

article link

Breeding wolf pack sighted in California

27th August 2015
Categories: wolf; California

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife released photos of five wolf pups with a pair of adults, one of them thought to be the wolf seen in the spring. It is the first confirmed sighting of a gray wolf pack in modern California history.


Read more: http://www.sacbee.com/news/local/environment/article31632431.html

DNA hints at earlier dog evolution

22nd May 2015
Categories: Canidae, evolution

Swedish researchers say that dogs may have been domesticated much earlier than some other studies suggest.

A genetic study indicates that dogs may have begun to split from wolves 27,000 years ago.

The discovery, in Current Biology, challenges the view that dogs were domesticated much more recently, around 15,000 years ago as humans changed from being hunter-gatherers to farmers.

The study might also explain the deep bond between dogs and humans.

Read more http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-32691843

On a Dhole Trail: Ecological and Anthropogenic Correlates of Dhole in the Western Ghats of India

5th June 2014
Categories: dhole

"On a Dhole Trail: Examining Ecological and Anthropogenic Correlates of Dhole Habitat Occupancy in the Western Ghats of India",  in PLoS One.

http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0098803

The lead author is Arjun Srivathsa, an alumnus of the post-graduate course in Wildlife Biology and Conservation, jointly run by WCS-India and National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS). The paper deals with assessing factors that influence distribution and habitat-use patterns of the endangered Asiatic Wild dog (dhole) in the Western Ghats landscape.